Varak Ketsemanian

Varak Ketsemanian graduated from the American University of Beirut in 2013 with a BA in philosophy and minor in history. After interning at the Armenian Weekly offices in Boston, MA, Ketsemanian enrolled at the University of Chicago in the MA program at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies (2014-2016). His MA thesis titled “Communities in Conflict: the Hunchakian Revolutionary Party 1890-1894” examines the socio-economic role of violence in shaping inter-communal and ethnic relations by doing a local history of the Armenian Revolutionary Movement in the Ottoman Empire. Ketsemanian is currently a PhD student at Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University planning on writing the social history of the Armenian National Constitution of 1863, and the communal dynamics that it created on imperial, communal, and provincial levels. Ketsemanian’s research relates to the development of different forms of nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, revolutionary violence, and constitutional movements. He has conducted research and has been involved in various projects in Turkey, USA, Lebanon and Armenia. He is the recipient of several awards and fellowships such as Fulbright, FLAS, and the Gulbenkian Scholarship for Armenian Studies among others. He is a frequent contributor to Aztag Daily, Asbarez and Armenian Weekly.

Articles by Varak Ketsemanian

The “Discursive Turn” of Armenian Politics

In this new essay for EVN Report, Varak Ketsemanian argues that one of the reasons Armenians have failed to come up with a palatable “national brand” lies in the absence of common political premises (beyond the Genocide and Artsakh) upon which collaborative platforms may be created in the Diaspora, but more importantly, in the Republic of Armenia.

Armenia: Anatomy of a State

After more than 25 years of independence, what can the role of the Armenian Republic be in shaping a discourse that would speak of Armenia in terms of a “homeland” and a genuine state?

The Intellectual Crisis of the Armenian Reality

Varak Ketsemanian presents a critical analysis of Sona B. Dadoyan’s work, “2015, The Armenian Condition in Hindsight and Foresight: A Discourse,” a timely and critical piece of scholarship that sheds light on the intellectual crisis of the 21st century Armenian reality.


30,000 Software Engineers in Armenia by 2025

The favorable IT climate in Armenia is the reason for the recent software boom.There are more than 450 IT companies, which are employing more than 10 thousand software developers and engineers. Around two thirds of Armenian IT output is exported to over 20 countries. So what is standing between Armenia and its dream of building a "Silicon Mountain"?

Making Armenia’s Economy Competitive, One Company at a Time

The engine to a developed economy is the competitiveness of local businesses, because they are the building blocks of the economy and the country’s development. It is time for Armenia’s economy to advance to the next level of efficiency and each company has a unique role to play in this regard, writes Sona Grigoryan.

Mindset of Armenian Startups: The Dos and the Don’ts

The emerging startup ecosystem in Armenia is very vibrant but faces many challenges. Tech expert and startup enthusiast, Artashes Vardanyan takes a critical look at the existing beliefs in the startup sector that need to be readjusted to ensure future success.


All rights reserved by EVN Report
Developed by Gugas Team