cultural heritage

Notre Heritage? The Uncomfortable Truths of Cultural Legacy in Peril

The fire that severely damaged the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris highlighted how indispensable art is for humanity and exposed the fragility of all cultural legacy. It also indicated the profoundly unbalanced ways through which the global community has come to evaluate the intellectual production of different cultures and nations.

repatriation

How Genocide Survivors Made Yerevan Great

From those who survived the Armenian Genocide to those who moved to Soviet Armenia during the Great Repatriation of the 1940s, Western Armenians contributed to Yerevan’s incredible rise as a major city, turning it into the heart and soul of the Armenian nation.

civil aviation

Tatevik Revazian: Don’t Say It’s Impossible, I Won't Believe You

Negotiating the complexities of civil aviation aside, Tatevik Revazian, chair of Armenia’s Civil Aviation Committee has had to learn how to negotiate the media landscape, trust less and break down stereotypes.

opinion

The Incoherence of Peace: The Karabakh Quagmire and the Fine Line Between Compromise and Capitulation

While taking the reader through the complexities of international law, Dr. Nerses Kopalyan writes that when Armenia and Azerbaijan speak about peace, they mean completely different things. What they are actually saying is that they seek peace on their own terms.

EVN Youth Report  

ballet

The Halls are Half Empty, the Restaurants Full

In Soviet Armenia, beyond the struggles of daily life, people were free to choose to be a part of the arts. But freedom in art was still limited. The situation changed after independence, there was freedom to be found in art but to choose art unreservedly, seemed ill-founded. Day-to-day struggles brought forth a dimension where the audience and the dancer were not connected.

music & memory

The Kurdish Voice of Radio Yerevan

Public Radio of Yerevan, known as Radyoya Erîvané or Erivan Radyosu* beyond the Armenian-Turkish border, has left a mark in the memories of thousands of Kurds across the Middle East, Europe and the former Soviet republics. Throughout the years when Kurdish language and culture were banned in Turkey, Radio Yerevan served as a bridge between the Kurdish people and their culture.

from Iran

The Armenian Footprint of Isfahan

Isfahan is more than just a place with an abundance of blue, hospitality and diplomacy, Isfahan is also Julfa, the old Armenian neighborhood where the domes of churches are not pointed but rather round like a Mosque’s, where an Armenian community, since 1605, continues to exist and has become an inseparable part of the fabric of this city once built to be the center of the world.

games & education

The Evolving Culture of Armenian Board Games

You most likely played Monopoly as a child, and if your first language was Armenian, then you most probably struggled to translate the content of the cards from English or Russian. Anahit Sukiasyan writes about how Armenian board games are being developed and gaining popularity.

EVN: A space for critical discourse and new narratives.

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 Portraits of Memory - Aram Manukyan  

 Portraits of Memory - Harutyun Marutyan 

Portraits of Memory: Gyumri

 

This year marks not only the 30th anniversary of the earthquake, but also the 30th anniversary of the start of the Karabakh Movement. Before the Velvet Revolution, EVN Report traveled to Gyumri to talk to the people there about their memories, concerns and dreams for the future. These are the voices of the participants of the 1988 Movement from Gyumri.

 

 

 

Introspective Armenia: Portraits of Memory

Dedicated to the 30th Anniversary of the Karabakh Movement

 

The 1988 Karabakh Movement brought about a period of intense and sweeping changes and the people of Armenia were leading the charge. 

 

 

Ինտրոսպեկտիվ Հայաստան. Հիշողության դիմանկարներ

Նվիրվում է Ղարաբաղյան շարժման 30-ամյակին

1988-ին սկասած Ղարաբաղյան Շարժումը ինտենսիվ և վիթխարի փոփոխությունների ժամանակաշրջան էր, որն առաջնորդում էր հայ ժողովուրդը: 

 

When we launched EVN Report on March 16, 2017 in Yerevan, our mission was to be the first reader-supported Armenian publication. But we had to prove to you, our reader, what we were made of. So, for the past year we have written extensively and critically about issues impacting our lives in Armenia and the Diaspora. Our goal was to elevate the conversation, to bring meaning and context to our own unique digital town square. We have also been a platform where the world can take a peek inside our complexities, hardships, accomplishments and victories. If you read something that meant something on EVN Report, then we are asking you to support us so that we maintain our independence and are accountable to you.

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